My thoughts on Miami Heat’s victory over the San Antonio Spurs

Lebron James holding the Larry O'Brien trophy (right) and the Bill Russell Finals MVP trophy (left).

Lebron James holding the Larry O’Brien trophy (right) and the Bill Russell Finals MVP trophy (left).

The Miami Heat won its second consecutive NBA title over the San Antonio Spurs after a tough series, which had to be extended to game 7 in Miami. It was a thrilling series in three years as  they were on the verge of defeat in game 6 until Ray Allen shot a 3-point field goal to secure an overtime and won the game 6 and be decided who should be the NBA champion in game 7. I watched the entire series from game 1 to 7 and had to flood my wall on Facebook that annoyed some of my friends as I had been waiting that series for eight years to happen and had to watch to decide whether Lebron could cement himself to be one of the greatest of all time in the NBA the time by the he retire someday or cement Tim Duncan’s legacy further as one of the best NBA players in this generation.

The path of the Miami Heat and the San Antonio Spurs to get the NBA Finals was different. The Heat’s path to the NBA finals was difficult compared to the Spurs as they had to reach game 7 to win the Eastern Conference Finals because they didn’t have immediate response to Roy Hibbert at the front court, Paul George at the back court, and the athleticism of the Pacers’ players. San Antonio Spurs had the easier path to the NBA Finals as they swept the Memphis Grizzlies, 4 games to nothing as the Memphis Grizzlies was too inexperienced to face the good combination of veteran and youth players of the Spurs and the Oklahoma City Thunder, who could have been the team to face the Miami Heat in the Finals, was eliminated by the Grizzlies due to Russell Westbrook injury in his right knee, rendering Thunder’s dream to have a Finals rematch with the Heat impossible.

The entire Finals series was close as crucial games had to be decided with razor-thin margins in game 1, 6, and 7 while both teams had to win over each other with overwhelming margins in game 2, 3, 4, 5. The series was considered a relatively low-scoring and defense focused for both teams as starting and reserve players like James, Wade, Bosh, Chalmers, Miller, Allen, and Battier for the Heat and Duncan, Parker, Ginobili, Green, Neal, Diaw and Leonard for the Spurs had defend the ball just to win the series, therefore, the NBA title.

Many fans and especially band wagoners had expected the Heat to win the series in an ease way, but they were wrong as the Spurs showed their courageous and tenancy efforts to fight for another NBA title despite of having their starting players way older than them. During game 1, the Spurs showed to the world that they could still made them tired and tougher to defend their title in 2012. The Heat accepted their challenge and proved the world that they were the best by forcing the game 6 into an overtime through Ray Allen’s 3-point field goal in the remaining seconds of the fourth quarter of the same game. Had Ray Allen’s 3 missed, the Spurs would have been the NBA champion, but of course, it didn’t happen.

Spurs’ defeat was not really because of Ray Allen’s 3-point shoot, but because of fatal mistakes of their head coach, Gregg Popovich of playing Manu Ginobili too much minutes, who was inconsistent throughout the series and playing Tiago Splitter in the start of fourth quarter that gave an opportunity for the Heat to destroy their defense at the front court. The same mistakes were committed by Popovich in game 7 as Ginobili played the fourth and he got tired probably that’s why he missed passes and shoots that would have been a victory for the Spurs in game 7.

The reason on why the Heat could not defeat the Spurs in 5 games was because of their weakness at the back court and the front court where Tim Duncan of the Spurs dominated the them on the latter. Lebron James still had his weakness at the perimeter (although improving throughout the years), Dwyane Wade was not 100% healthy, and Chris Bosh was inconsistent at the back court. They had to rely Chalmers, Miller, Battier, and Allen to win the series to match Spurs’ strength at the back court.

The moral lesson of the series is that we need to have a sort of consistency to win the series and if the momentum is almost in our hands, never fumble it. The series was the proof that any veteran teams can still have chances to reach NBA finals or even winning the title itself.

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Boston Marathon bombing and April curse?

The moment when the Marathon was disrupted by an explosion (the picture taken was the second consecutive) on the sidewalk of the finishing line, which killed 3 lives and injured another 183.

The moment when the Marathon was disrupted by an explosion (the picture taken was the second consecutive) on the sidewalk of the finishing line, which killed 3 lives and injured another 183.

When I woke up last Tuesday morning (Monday afternoon in Boston), I opened my Facebook account and immediately when I looked on my newsfeed, I was flooded with the news about the bombing of the Boston Marathon. I was about to go to school for a class, but before that, I had to send my condolences to the families of 3 souls that had been killed during the bombing.

After my morning class on the same day, I ate first for a launch in a fast food chain in front of my university and after that, I went to an internet cafe, just a meter away from the fast food chain and immediately browsed the web through Google and YouTube to see the big picture during the Boston Marathon bombing, which I described as horrible and whoever had detonated the bomb shall be condemned to hell for using an sport event to have his grievances be heard.

I realized that the Boston Marathon bombing happened in the same week, 20 years ago, when a standoff done by the members of Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas had ended into a bloody resolution where dozens of casualties were reported. 18 years ago, the same week, there was an explosion in Oklahoma City which caused 168 deaths and injured 680 and was considered as the worst terrorist attack on US continental soil before 9/11. 14 years ago, the same week, two senior high school students at Columbine High School in Denver killed 15 including the perpetrators and another 21 were injured in which the event was considered as the worst school shooting incidents in the United States before the Sandy Hook last December.  6 years ago, the same week, a frustrated perpetrator who was born in South Korea killed 33 individuals and injured another 17 in which the same was considered as the worst school shooting incident done by a gunman.  101 years ago, the same week and the same day, the then-“unsinkable” Titanic was sunk on the middle of the Atlantic Ocean after she collided with an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton, United Kingdom to New York City, United States which caused 1,502 deaths in one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in modern history.

Days later, in Waco, Texas, there was an explosion in a fertilizer farm which caused 35 deaths and counting as of this moment and another 180 injuries and counting.

This week also has been commemorated among Boston residents the 238th anniversary of the first military engagement between the American colonialists and the British Army where the colonialist won the battle in Lexington (miles away from Boston) and marking the start of the American Revolution which brought the colonialist independence from Britain in 1776 and recognized by Britain in 1783. The Boston Marathon has been held annually since 1897 during the Patriots’ Day, a civic holiday in the state of Massachusetts commemorating the anniversary of the Battles of Lexington and Concord.

Not trying to be a conspiracy theorist, but I am wondering on why such tragedies that involves American lives coincide during the third week of April. Is this a curse or just a coincidence, you decide.

Manny Pacquiao lost

Juan Manuel Marquez punched Manny Pacquiao's right chin that brought the latter to a humiliating defeat.

Juan Manuel Marquez punched Manny Pacquiao’s right chin that brought the latter into a humiliating defeat.

After eight years of frustration, Juan Manuel Marquez was able to defeat Manny Pacquiao through a counter (a lucky punch if you ask the others) right punch into Pacquiao’s right chin that brought the surprise defeat of Manny Pacquiao.

After losing the previous two and drawing one in three fights, the bigger and stronger Marquez prevailed this time.

I did not expect that Juan Manuel Marquez could able to knock Manny Pacquiao out from the right side as the fight progressed, Pacquiao was able to counter some powerful punches of Marquez during the third and fourth rounds that brought the former of being knocked down during at the middle of the third round.

That fight before the end of the sixth round was similar with other three wherein there were no convincing victory for both sides and could have been repeated with that fight had Marquez never released his powerful right punch into Pacquiao’s right chin. I was projecting with a draw before the powerful punch by Marquez because both sides were able to exchange punches to each other as Marquez experienced bleeding in his face while Pacquiao as the fight progressed by, was starting to lose coordination and strength as the result of series of counter punches by Marquez.

That fight won through accuracy by Juan Manuel Marquez of finding the loopholes of Manny Pacquiao like weak defense beyond the latter’s face as Marquez found timely execution of his powerful punch into Pacquiao’s right chin. Manny Pacquiao could have continued the fight until the end and maybe won had he maintain his coordination and strength that he regained during the fifth round.

After that fight, I realized that it is the time for Manny Pacquiao to throw his towels in order to preserve his legacy in boxing and focus in other fields where he could flourish like preaching.