The Philippines’ investment grade does not guarantee foreign direct investments (FDI)

The Philippines gained its  first investment grade from Fitch, an international credit rating agency.

The Philippines gained its first investment grade from Fitch, an international credit rating agency.

The Fitch, an international credit rating agency, upgraded the Philippines’ Long-Term Foreign-Currency Issuer Default Rating (IDR) to ‘BBB-‘ from ‘BB+’. The Long-Term Local-Currency IDR has been upgraded to ‘BBB’ from ‘BBB-‘. The Outlooks on both ratings are Stable.

The agency has also upgraded the Country Ceiling to ‘BBB’ from ‘BBB-‘ and the Short-Term Foreign-Currency IDR to ‘F3’ from ‘B’.

The significance of upgrading the credit rating of the Philippines by the Fitch to an investment grade is that the cost of obtaining credit by the government and the private businesses from the international financial market would decrease as they would perceive that our country’s finances are stable to caution for any external or internal shockwaves that may hit our economy. It means that more opportunity for the government and the private businesses to borrow money to invest in our economy, no matter it is for real job generation or speculative purposes.

In the eyes of some foreign investors who are not really knowledgeable the culture of doing business in our country, they would perceived that the Philippines is open and stable to do their business even though it is not.

I glad that the Philippines obtained its investment grade by the Fitch due to our government especially during the previous Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo’s government, who sacrificed herself to push her initiatives to balance our government finances and assuring private investors to invest in our economy despite of several attempts by FPGMA’s opponent to topple her from the president back then and the Subprime financial crisis that affected the economic development during the sunset of her administration. Fortunately for the current president, Benigno Aquino III, he continued what her predecessor had done by maintaining the fiscal soundness of our government and stability in our economy despite of the weak global economy.

However, the investment grade given to us from the Fitch does not assure that bulks of foreign direct investments needed for our long-term economic development will come to our country, whether short-term or long-term, as our government has not yet addressed the pressing concerns of easing the cost of doing business for foreign investors to do their business for massive job generation like constitutional 60/40 foreign ownership restrictions of setting-up enterprise, unnecessary fees and permits needed to comply by a foreign investor, red-tape in the government, and many others.

Foreign individuals or multinational corporations will not easily affirmed the notion that our country’s recent investment grade  means that their investments are safe from the barriers I stated above as these investors who wants to pour their capital in infrastructure, manufacturing, mining, oil and gas extraction, agriculture, transportation, and tourism will not going to waste their time and especially money to follow or circumvent our stringent regulations of doing business and instead, they would rather invest their bulks of capital to countries with liberal investment regulations like Vietnam, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Cambodia, or even Myanmar, which these countries could give a better assurance for their investment to realize than us. Only those who are in the speculative portfolio investment industry will pour their capital in our country which in nature, for short-term and does not generate bulks of employment opportunities for millions of Filipinos who are unemployed or underemployed.

Therefore, we have to be cautious and realistic that investment grade does not give an assurance that our country has a better environment for businesses and jobs to flourish. Once the government addresses political constricts on doing business, this would be the time that foreign direct investments will pour in our country for our economic development.

3 thoughts on “The Philippines’ investment grade does not guarantee foreign direct investments (FDI)

  1. i agree with you Joseph. It is still an obstacle to do business in the Philippines because of that 60% restriction to foreign ownership of its own company. Plus the Philippines isn’t trying to invest on creating long term infrastructures to lure foreign companies to invest in tech manufacturing, services, research and development. Additionally, Bad and narrow roads, old transportations, the absence of bus stations, no enough train stations, pollution because lack of tree parks, etc..

    If the government is serious about welcoming foreign investors, they have to change all of the above.

    -Goody Brown-

  2. Typical sour grapes comments. Despite the effort shown by the whole Philippines to gain recognition on their economic development there will still be some people like you who will never be satisfied. There is no such a perfect country in terms of economic development, Philippines did its best and its still doing its best to attract more FDI so they can give these little wishes of additional bus stations you mentioned.

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